Take Shelter

Donna Moylan

September 5 – October 5, 2020

Donna Moylan, Take Shelter

Donna Moylan

Take Shelter

2020

Acrylic on panel 

11 x 14 in. (plus frame)

(27.94 x 35.56 cm.)

$ 2.500

Donna Moylan, Distant Closeness

Donna Moylan

Distant Closeness

2020

Acrylic and oil on panel

24 x 30 in.

(60.96 x 76.20 cm.)

$ 5.500

Donna Moylan, Togetherness

Donna Moylan

Togetherness

2020

Acrylic and flashe on panel with frame

16 x 20 in.

(40.64 x 50.80 cm.)

$ 5.000

Donna Moylan, Protection

Donna Moylan

Protection

2019

Acrylic and oil on panel

16 x 20 in.

(40.64 x 50.80 cm.)

$ 5.000

Donna Moylan, Patio Parties

Donna Moylan

Patio Parties

2020

Acrylic on panel

24 x 30 in.

(60.96 x 76.20 cm.)

$ 5.500

Donna Moylan, Lockdown

Donna Moylan

Lockdown

2020

Acrylic on panel

24 x 30 in.

(60.96 x 76.20 cm.)

$ 5.000

Donna Moylan, Summer Fall Winter Spring

Donna Moylan

Summer Fall Winter Spring

2018-2019

Oil on panel

24 x 30 in.

(60.96 x 76.20 cm.)

SOLD

Donna Moylan, Planters

Donna Moylan

Planters

2018-2019

Acrylic and oil on panel

16 x 20 in.

(40.64 x 50.80 cm.)

$ 5.000

Donna Moylan, Glacier

Donna Moylan

Glacier

2020

Oil on canvas

48 x 52 in.

(121.92 x 132.08 cm.)

$ 6.500

Donna Moylan, Tender Creek

Donna Moylan

Tender Creek

2020

Acrylic on panel

48 x 36 in.

(121.92 x 91.44 cm.)

$ 6.000

Donna Moylan, Tender Creek

Donna Moylan

Tender Creek (first version)

2020

Acrylic and oil on canvas

14 x 11 in.

(35.56 x 27.94 cm.)

$ 2.500

Press Release

Donna Moylan

Take Shelter

 

Tanja Grunert Salon

Princess Beatrix House

 

Opening Day

Saturday September 5, 10am - 7pm

Therafter the Salon is open Friday - Monday, 12-6pm

An exhibition of new paintings by Donna Moylan will open on Saturday. September 5 and remain on view through Monday, October 5, 2020 at Tanja Grunert Salon, Princess Beatrix House in Hudson, NY.

 

"Donna Moylan’s paintings often depict vast expanses of sky and field within which tiny wispy figures cavort, sit or creep. With a tender, awkward grace she ambitiously commands deep space through an accumulation of ghostly brushstrokes. The figures appear to be visiting or about to escape through portals – repeated simple forms like frames, virus particles, pods – giving her psychological landscapes a folk sci fi feel. The word effluvia comes to mind – vapors, invisible particles, auras – that often have an unpleasant smell, but in Moylan’s work it takes on an eerie, candied quality. The mid 20th century existential landscapes of Tanguy, Dali, Magritte and lesser known painters like Paul Nash and"George Ault, especially his Universal Symphony (1947) provide a historical anchor, as does the time period. The world was in global crisis and certain artists imagined it as the deserted calm of an unreachable horizon populated with mutant, apparitional or abstracted human presences. What is it to be a personhood in the cosmos? Moylan’s work suggests a certain amount of optimism and playfulness despite a global pandemic, looming tyranny and social unrest: one painting is called When it’s Over We Shall Dance. But our existential predicament remains. In Summer Fall Winter Spring, trees are like stand-ins for people who meet in an impossible meadow outside seasons and time. There is a dark cosmic zip in the background and an undulating fold of landscape at the bottom, each revealing the lurking blackness that anchors all human experience, reminding me of this Albert Einstein quote: “As our circle of knowledge expands so does the circumference of darkness surrounding it."

Jennifer Coates

 

Moylan has exhibited her work extensively in the United States and in Europe. After living in Rome, Italy, for 23 years, she came to New York City in the early 1990’s. Her shows have been reviewed in The New York Times, The New Yorker, Newsweek, ArtForum, Art in America and other publications. Moylan’s paintings are included in The Collezione Maramotti, the Whitney Museum of American Art and the New York Public Library Collection as well as numerous private collections.

 

Artist statement:

There is something mysterious and a little transgressive about seeing an art show in a domestic setting. The usual inhabitants of the house become ghostlike, neither going about their everyday business nor absent. The empty furniture appears somewhat abashed, with chairs unnaturally pressed against the walls and a dining table patiently waiting — all suspended for an agreed-upon length of time — while paintings and sculptures take up residence.

To me, opening the door to 21 Prospect Avenue is to enter a different world, a European house. It is Tanja herself who fills it with a sensibility she brings from Europe and who makes the atmosphere tersely Avantgarde.

I was delighted when Tanja invited me to have an exhibit in her house in Hudson. The show, called Take Shelter, is about coping with the pandemic, thinking about some of the changes happening in the world. The paintings are mostly Covid-time work done in nearby Kinderhook.

During the time many of us have been coronavirus-aware we have been changing our outlook on how to live as we adapt to the information scientists and researchers provide. First it seemed every surface was pullulating with virus: people were washing the mail, wiping down doorknobs. Now we are only obliged to be distant from one another and to shield our facial orifices and yet the virus is more vivid now that we know it better — the monster.

Tanja Grunert’s house is across from the antique part of the rural hospital in Hudson, NY. A high point in the area with long long views onto mountains and valleys and lots of sky, it’s easy to remember how for a hundred years these hilly parts of New York were dotted with places where people came for the clean air away from the cities to recover from respiratory illnesses.

These days, although many of us came upstate (a term to mean also the countryside in MA and PA, as David Humphrey correctly tells me) to find a house to live and work in the country — with the Amtrak station right there to zip into the heart of Manhattan in couple of hours — now we stay. We think of the city, down there, south at the end of that big river, we go in maybe now and then; mostly we await the fall season to figure out what to do, where to go.

WHEN IT’S OVER WE SHALL DANCE

Donna Moylan 
August, 2020